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Moss colony that's thriving on my dueling boxwoods.
satoshidoodles tipped:
0.03 USD
1 year ago
emily tipped:
0.02 USD
1 year ago
glauce tipped:
0.02 USD
1 year ago
This little beauty fell from a roof, don't know the species, but would love to learn if anyone can tell.
bonsai_guy replied:
Looks like pincushion moss. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucobryum
glauce replied:
Thank you@bonsai_guy, the name is as cute as the moss... will look it up!
bonsai_guy replied:
Might not be the exact identification but it gives you something to start with. I'm more of a bonsai guy rather then a moss guy, but it's hard not to like the humble bryophyte :)
glauce replied:
It is great indeed to have a starting point, they are growing in a wildflower garden and are the only ones I can't get information on, so am very happy, thank you! Oh, I always wonder about bonsai... are the trees happy being made to grow so small, that puzzles me
bonsai_guy replied:
You would be the first person to ask me that! I'm glad because it's a thought I have sometimes myself. Most trees tolerate it quite well but with a few caveats. The smaller confined pot means the tree will need more frequent watering/fertilizer. You need to re-pot/root prune on a yearly basis to provide fresh soil and aeration. The trees are smaller and more vulnerable but their overall health isn't compromised.
glauce replied:
Oh, that is so nice to hear, thank you! I always feel a bit of angst when I see bonsai trees in their tiny pots... I see what you mean though, I guess we have to learn of the care that goes in growing them, you conveyed a kind of love which is beautiful.
I love moss but always lived in hot climates so never been able to grow it. What are ideal conditions?
bonsai_guy replied:
It depends on the moss. In a general sense moss tend to thrive in pacific northwest/north atlantic type conditions. So early morning sun with afternoon shade and high humidity with temps in the 50-75F range. Food wise they usually prefer glucose and acidic conditions. This is why you will frequently find them around old tree stumps. Rocks/stones also provide good sanctuary as they also have the additional effect of providing thermal stability the moss prefers. There are a few different techniques to growing moss. The easiest is to use which ever moss grows locally. Take a sample of the moss you want to grow and provide it a container with the right food/sunlight/moisture much like a plant.The overall maintenance will be low since nature will do most of the work for you. A common technique is to mix some moss in a food blender with some buttermilk, then paint it onto the area you want. I do not like this technique because the buttermilk will have a bad smell and results can sometimes be iffy. My kyoto moss I start from scratch with spores with clean substrate but boy is it stubborn haha.
glauce replied:
I like to add that moss tends to grow in environments free from pollutants and are often seen as good indicators of clean air and nice places to live. I have been growing moss for a few years and feel lucky to have a variety of species thriving in my garden, some arrived on their own accord, others I transplanted or even rescued as they fell from neighbouring roofs. Some species seem to be able to take a bit of sun, but most of them like shady, moist areas. When using pots, I make sure the compost (or any other base) is organic, they wouldn't survive if there are any chemicals in the mix.
bonsai_guy tipped:
0.1 USD
1 year ago
苔いいですよね〜 Moss is very Charming and soothing
bonsai_guy tipped:
0.1 USD
1 year ago
glauce replied:
Very nicely put
It's beautiful! My husband loves moss. He is opposed to killing it anywhere (but I am tempted to powerwash some spots, like steps and most of the patio). So far, he is winning this year.
bonsai_guy tipped:
0.03 USD
1 year ago
bonsai_guy replied:
I have discovered a certain humility in growing moss. The kyoto moss I normally grow can be very temperamental because my climate gets a little too hot for it. Looks great on bonsai trees but is finicky to maintain and slow growing. The moss in the photo is an unidentified local variety I found near me. It seems to be better adapted for my area (Makes sense seeing that it grows wild without help where I live). I plan to probably use this one for my trees in the future.
satoshidoodles replied:
I wanted to reply to one of your replies, but can't. You mentioned blending moss with buttermilk and painting with that mixture. I've seen that idea as a way to do "moss graffiti". Thinking of doing this locally. Will send you a photo if successful.
bonsai_guy replied:
hmm.. some kind of glitch or bug maybe?. Yeah the butter milk method is good for inoculating moss onto surfaces that don't have the right cellulose/food. I shy away from the method because it's not as practical for how I use moss and seems messy. This exchange has motivated me to pick up some books on moss gardening. I'll report back what I learn! Please do post some pictures! I will leave you with a proverb I once read on the back of a packet of spores "Moss are like people, you have to be patient."